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Asana name: Thunderbolt Pose

Sanskrit name: Vajrasan

Meaning: Thunderbolt Pose

General Benefits:
Alters the flow of blood and nervous impulses in the pelvic region and strengthens the pelvic muscles. Increases efficiency of the entire digestive system. It aids in digestion immediately after eating. This is the only asana that can be practiced after a meal, ideally for ten minutes. It is an important meditation posture because the body becomes upright and straight with no effort. The mind and body becomes stabilized and hence it is one of the recommended asanas for pranayam, concentration and meditation. Stimulates the vajra nadi and redirects sexual energy. - The special fold of the legs forms a bandha. This bandha controls the blood circulation from the waist downwards which is the reason this asana is recommended after Shirshasan. It also means that there is increased blood circulation in the abdominal area.


Benefits for Women:


Therapeutic Applications:
Weak digestive system


Taking the Position:
In sitting position, bend your left leg and bring the foot to the left buttock. Bend your right leg and place the right foot next to the left foot. Shift the weight forward onto the toes. Bring your knees to the ground, toes together, heels apart and sit between your heels. Place the palms of your hands on the knees. Maintain the asana, breathing normally.


Releasing the Positions:
To release the asana, remove the hands from the knees and return them to your sides. Raise your knees and shift your weight onto your toes. Straighten the left leg. Straighten the right leg and lower the buttocks to the ground returning to sitting position.


Anatomical Focus:
Lumbar region of the spinal column. Lower abdomen.


Anatomical Awareness:
Focus on lower back, buttocks


Do's:
Remember to breathe normally while in the pose, as there would be a tendency to stop doing so.


Don'ts:
Tense up the whole body while lifting the legs off the ground and maintaining it. The body should be soft and efforts to be made on relaxing the body.


Step 1


Step 2


Step 3


Step 4


Precautions & Contraindications:
People who have any spinal column ailments, especially on the lower vertebrae should not attempt this pose. Those with hernia, intestinal ulcers and other diseases of the small and large intestine should practice this pose under expert guidance and advice. Beginners should work slowly on improving the strength of the lower back muscles, before lifting the legs up or increasing the duration to hold this pose. This would help in minimizing the strain of the breath. Benefits of this pose are greatly minimized if the individual capacity is exceeded. One should practice minimum lifting and increased duration, instead of maximum lifting of the legs and maintaining the posture for a shorter time. The ideal pose should be achieved under these guidelines.


Variations & Tips:
For a start, focus should be on maintaining a slow and rhythmic breathing. This could be achieved when the pose is steady and comfortable. People often lift the legs up too high, and end up straining the body and breath. As in Niralamba Bhunjungasana (lengthening the torso to the front), think of lengthening the legs to the back of the room. Stretch the entire length of the legs, but do not tense up while doing so. Practice patience and humility in the pose. Move into the posture in a slow, controlled& systematically way, so as to keep the awareness and ideal position in mind at all times.


Preparatory Poses:
Ardha Shalabhasana. Shalabhasana


Follow-up Poses:
Makarasana. Vajarasana Type 1 with arms relaxed by the side of the legs a.k.a Child Pose. Shavasana


Position:
Prone.